Mode

kid

parent

The Sasquatch Escape

Ages

9+
When Ben’s parents ship him off to Buttonville to spend the summer with his grandfather, he’s sure it’s going to be the most boring eight weeks ever. But then the cat shows up with an injured baby dragon, and Ben’s ordinary summer quickly turns into the adventure of a lifetime.
Ages 9+
Pages 240
Publisher Hachette
Coming Aug 2022

Average Rating

122 Reviews
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What the Book is About

When 10-year-old Ben Silverstein is sent to spend the summer with his grandfather Abe in the tiny rundown town of Buttonville, he’s sure it’s going to be the most boring eight weeks of his life. Fortunately, things get a little more exciting when Ben’s grandfather’s cat brings home an injured baby dragon. Along with the help of Pearl Petal, the town troublemaker, Ben discovers that the old button factory on the edge of town is actually a secret hospital for imaginary creatures. When Ben and Pearl bring the baby dragon there for treatment, they accidentally set a sasquatch free on the town! Thankfully, the mysterious Dr. Woo has left a Sasquatch Catching Kit along with detailed instructions. Between the imaginary creatures, the ridiculous antics of the sasquatch, and the children’s bravery, there is plenty of humor and adventure that younger readers will love.

Jewish Content & Values

  • Ben’s grandfather, Abe Silverstein, is Jewish. Abe has a mezuzah on his doorpost, and he uses a variety of Yiddish words and phrases. He also eats kosher food, including hot dogs, brisket, and knishes
  • There are several references to Shabbat, including Abe’s Shabbat candlesticks, eating challah, and counting the stars to determine when Shabbat is over.
  • The children’s commitment to caring for the animals (both real and imaginary) in the story is an excellent example of tza’ar ba’alei chayim, the Jewish prohibition against causing unnecessary suffering to animals.

Positive Role Models

  • Even though Ben isn’t excited about spending the summer with his grandfather, he quickly adapts to his new situation. He’s helpful to his grandfather and eager to make new friends. He cares deeply about animals and works hard to keep all the animals in his life safe.
  • Ben’s grandfather, Abe, is a kind man who is welcoming to his grandson and committed to his community.
  • Dr. Woo, a veterinarian who works with imaginary creatures, gives the children clear instructions explaining how to capture the Sasquatch without agitating or injuring it. At the end of the book, she offers them each a summer apprenticeship.

Content Advisory

None.

Talk It Over

If you could meet one mythical animal (dragon, unicorn, pegasus, phoenix, sasquatch, etc.), which one would you choose and why?

More for You

Jewish folklore includes a long history of mythological creatures. The behemoth is a large creature similar to an elephant or rhinoceros, and the leviathan is a sea monster; both are depicted in the Book of Job and other biblical stories. The re’em, which has been described as either a unicorn or oryx, appears nine times in the Tanakh, or Hebrew Bible. The ziz is a giant bird that has been compared to both the griffin and the phoenix. Finally, the shamir is a mystical worm capable of cutting through stone and diamond; according to Jewish legend, King Solomon used it to build the First Temple in Jerusalem, as iron tools that could be used for violence should not be used to build a temple to peace.
What the Book is About

What the Book is About

When 10-year-old Ben Silverstein is sent to spend the summer with his grandfather Abe in the tiny rundown town of Buttonville, he’s sure it’s going to be the most boring eight weeks of his life. Fortunately, things get a little more exciting when Ben’s grandfather’s cat brings home an injured baby dragon. Along with the help of Pearl Petal, the town troublemaker, Ben discovers that the old button factory on the edge of town is actually a secret hospital for imaginary creatures. When Ben and Pearl bring the baby dragon there for treatment, they accidentally set a sasquatch free on the town! Thankfully, the mysterious Dr. Woo has left a Sasquatch Catching Kit along with detailed instructions. Between the imaginary creatures, the ridiculous antics of the sasquatch, and the children’s bravery, there is plenty of humor and adventure that younger readers will love.

Jewish Content & Values

  • Ben’s grandfather, Abe Silverstein, is Jewish. Abe has a mezuzah on his doorpost, and he uses a variety of Yiddish words and phrases. He also eats kosher food, including hot dogs, brisket, and knishes
  • There are several references to Shabbat, including Abe’s Shabbat candlesticks, eating challah, and counting the stars to determine when Shabbat is over.
  • The children’s commitment to caring for the animals (both real and imaginary) in the story is an excellent example of tza’ar ba’alei chayim, the Jewish prohibition against causing unnecessary suffering to animals.

Positive Role Models

  • Even though Ben isn’t excited about spending the summer with his grandfather, he quickly adapts to his new situation. He’s helpful to his grandfather and eager to make new friends. He cares deeply about animals and works hard to keep all the animals in his life safe.
  • Ben’s grandfather, Abe, is a kind man who is welcoming to his grandson and committed to his community.
  • Dr. Woo, a veterinarian who works with imaginary creatures, gives the children clear instructions explaining how to capture the Sasquatch without agitating or injuring it. At the end of the book, she offers them each a summer apprenticeship.

Content Advisory

None.

Talk It Over

If you could meet one mythical animal (dragon, unicorn, pegasus, phoenix, sasquatch, etc.), which one would you choose and why?

More for You

Jewish folklore includes a long history of mythological creatures. The behemoth is a large creature similar to an elephant or rhinoceros, and the leviathan is a sea monster; both are depicted in the Book of Job and other biblical stories. The re’em, which has been described as either a unicorn or oryx, appears nine times in the Tanakh, or Hebrew Bible. The ziz is a giant bird that has been compared to both the griffin and the phoenix. Finally, the shamir is a mystical worm capable of cutting through stone and diamond; according to Jewish legend, King Solomon used it to build the First Temple in Jerusalem, as iron tools that could be used for violence should not be used to build a temple to peace.