Mode

kid

parent

Adina at Her Best

Ages

9+
Adina just can’t seem to stay out of trouble. But sometimes that’s exactly where she needs to be!
Ages 9+
Pages 83
Publisher Menucha Publishers
Coming Nov 2021

Average Rating

9 Reviews
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What the Book Is About

Adina struggles with controlling impulsive behavior and often finds herself in trouble at school and at home.  Her supportive parents have tried to encourage her to accept help, but she’s unwilling to cooperate. When she is asked to wait out an activity while on a school trip with her fourth-grade class, she despairs of ever regaining the respect of her peers.
 
Luckily for Mr. Hernandez, Adina is in exactly the right place at the right time to recognize the early signs of a stroke. All ends well as Mr. Hernandez recovers and Adina becomes more accepting of her own neurodiversity. This cute, short book will resonate with kids who struggle with “good” behavior as well as their friends and classmates.

Jewish Content & Values

  • Adina attends a Jewish Orthodox day school where boys and girls study in separate buildings.
  • Adina and her peers use Hebrew and Yiddish words in daily conversation, such as Baruch Hashem (thank God) chutzpadik (backtalk) and Pirkei Avot (Ethics of the Fathers).
  • Adina and her classmates are exhorted to make a Kiddush Hashem and sanctify God’s name by behaving well while on a school trip.
  • Hashgacha Pratit (Divine Providence) is evident as Adina notices and memorizes the mnemonic for early stroke identification in her father’s car, hours before she meets a stroke victim. 

Positive Role Models

  • Adina takes responsibility and insists on helping Mr. Hernandez, even though she is in disgrace for behaving impulsively during the tour.   
  • Adina’s parents are supportive of her and try to help her work through her challenges. 

Content Advisory

None.

Talk It Over

On the trip, Adina goes from class disgrace to class hero in just a few moments. Is considering what your classmates think of you important? Why or why not?
What the Book Is About

What the Book Is About

Adina struggles with controlling impulsive behavior and often finds herself in trouble at school and at home.  Her supportive parents have tried to encourage her to accept help, but she’s unwilling to cooperate. When she is asked to wait out an activity while on a school trip with her fourth-grade class, she despairs of ever regaining the respect of her peers.
 
Luckily for Mr. Hernandez, Adina is in exactly the right place at the right time to recognize the early signs of a stroke. All ends well as Mr. Hernandez recovers and Adina becomes more accepting of her own neurodiversity. This cute, short book will resonate with kids who struggle with “good” behavior as well as their friends and classmates.

Jewish Content & Values

  • Adina attends a Jewish Orthodox day school where boys and girls study in separate buildings.
  • Adina and her peers use Hebrew and Yiddish words in daily conversation, such as Baruch Hashem (thank God) chutzpadik (backtalk) and Pirkei Avot (Ethics of the Fathers).
  • Adina and her classmates are exhorted to make a Kiddush Hashem and sanctify God’s name by behaving well while on a school trip.
  • Hashgacha Pratit (Divine Providence) is evident as Adina notices and memorizes the mnemonic for early stroke identification in her father’s car, hours before she meets a stroke victim. 

Positive Role Models

  • Adina takes responsibility and insists on helping Mr. Hernandez, even though she is in disgrace for behaving impulsively during the tour.   
  • Adina’s parents are supportive of her and try to help her work through her challenges. 

Content Advisory

None.

Talk It Over

On the trip, Adina goes from class disgrace to class hero in just a few moments. Is considering what your classmates think of you important? Why or why not?