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For 13-year-old Nat, the only good thing about moving back to England is being near his favorite soccer team. After a scout spots Nat's incredible soccer skills, it looks like his dreams are about to come true! But when Nat uncovers a shady plot, he must find a way to save the team – and himself.
 
Ages 10+
Pages 314
Publisher Green Bean Books
Coming Aug 2020

Average Rating

102 Reviews
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What the Book is About

Since Nat’s mom died, he and his dad have been moving from country to country – but after seven years of traveling and playing street soccer, it’s finally time to return to England. Nat isn’t thrilled about being home, but at least their new house is close to his favorite soccer team. Then, when a scout spots Nat’s soccer skills, he gets the chance to make his dream of being a professional player come true! But there’s something fishy – and potentially dangerous – going on at the club. In an effort to help his team, Nat risks getting in over his head both on and off the pitch. This sports-meets-thriller story will appeal to every kid who dreams of becoming a hero.

Jewish Content & Values

  • Even though Nat and his father have been traveling around the world for several years, his dad ensures that when Nat turns 13 in Paris, they go to temple and he is called up to the bimah as a bar mitzvah. When they move back to England, Nat’s dad fixes a mezuzah onto the door frame of their new home.
  • Nat’s father was raised by his grandparents, his Bubbe and Zaida, and he sprinkles Yiddishisms in his speech.
  • Nat pursues his dream with determination and perseverance (hatmadah), even when team members are nasty and try to discourage him.

Positive Role Models

  • Nat’s father, Dave, gave up his chance to try to become a professional soccer player when he was young because he felt he had a responsibility to earn a steady living to help his financially challenged grandparents, who had raised him.
  • Nat is committed to his dream of playing soccer professionally. When he is given the chance to make his mark, he behaves responsibly and with maturity, and when he discovers that someone he admires is involved in shady dealings, he does the right thing and helps bring the criminal to justice.

Content Advisory

When Nat is caught overhearing a criminal plot involving the team, he is captured, dragged across a room, knocked unconscious, and locked in a cell without food or water. The fans, including Nat’s father, believe he has been killed. All turns out well in the end.
 

Talk It Over

Nat and his father disagree over whether Nat should play soccer at a high level when he’s technically too young to be on the team. If you were in Nat’s father’s shoes, would you let Nat play or not? Why would you make that decision?
 

More for You

In England, where Nat Levy is from, Jews are twice as likely as any other group to be fans of soccer – or football, as it’s called in Britain. Yet, although Nat is a professional English Jewish soccer player, in real life, they’re few and far between. Only three halachically Jewish players have ever played in the top professional teams in England. The most famous British player with Jewish heritage is David Beckham, who went to synagogue with his Jewish grandfather when he was a child and considers himself half-Jewish.
What the Book is About

What the Book is About

Since Nat’s mom died, he and his dad have been moving from country to country – but after seven years of traveling and playing street soccer, it’s finally time to return to England. Nat isn’t thrilled about being home, but at least their new house is close to his favorite soccer team. Then, when a scout spots Nat’s soccer skills, he gets the chance to make his dream of being a professional player come true! But there’s something fishy – and potentially dangerous – going on at the club. In an effort to help his team, Nat risks getting in over his head both on and off the pitch. This sports-meets-thriller story will appeal to every kid who dreams of becoming a hero.

Jewish Content & Values

  • Even though Nat and his father have been traveling around the world for several years, his dad ensures that when Nat turns 13 in Paris, they go to temple and he is called up to the bimah as a bar mitzvah. When they move back to England, Nat’s dad fixes a mezuzah onto the door frame of their new home.
  • Nat’s father was raised by his grandparents, his Bubbe and Zaida, and he sprinkles Yiddishisms in his speech.
  • Nat pursues his dream with determination and perseverance (hatmadah), even when team members are nasty and try to discourage him.

Positive Role Models

  • Nat’s father, Dave, gave up his chance to try to become a professional soccer player when he was young because he felt he had a responsibility to earn a steady living to help his financially challenged grandparents, who had raised him.
  • Nat is committed to his dream of playing soccer professionally. When he is given the chance to make his mark, he behaves responsibly and with maturity, and when he discovers that someone he admires is involved in shady dealings, he does the right thing and helps bring the criminal to justice.

Content Advisory

When Nat is caught overhearing a criminal plot involving the team, he is captured, dragged across a room, knocked unconscious, and locked in a cell without food or water. The fans, including Nat’s father, believe he has been killed. All turns out well in the end.
 

Talk It Over

Nat and his father disagree over whether Nat should play soccer at a high level when he’s technically too young to be on the team. If you were in Nat’s father’s shoes, would you let Nat play or not? Why would you make that decision?
 

More for You

In England, where Nat Levy is from, Jews are twice as likely as any other group to be fans of soccer – or football, as it’s called in Britain. Yet, although Nat is a professional English Jewish soccer player, in real life, they’re few and far between. Only three halachically Jewish players have ever played in the top professional teams in England. The most famous British player with Jewish heritage is David Beckham, who went to synagogue with his Jewish grandfather when he was a child and considers himself half-Jewish.